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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
at the scene just outside of the consulate in benghazi. as a crowd tries to move stevens, still alive, to the hospital. tonight, "360" has obtained exclusive information about the events leading up to his killing. they say in the months before his death, he talked about what he called the never-ending security threats, especially in benghazi. he specifically mentioned the rise in islamic extremism and said he was on an al qaeda hit list. in addition, our source tells us he e-mail aid journalist in the wake of a bombing near the consulate in june. he wrote, i quote, maybe you should travel to bengazi in light of the situation there, that appears to be heating up. what we don't know is why, given all that ambassador stevens thought why he travelled with such a light security detail and why he was allowed to? did he want it that way or did the risks go unheeded and he and his people die because of it? at this point we simply don't know. senator john mccain supported president obama's action to oust moammar khadafy and the president's steps taken since then. i spoke to senator mccain earl
is waiting for answers while the fbi investigating the killing of four americans in benghazi, libya, our sources say that not one fbi investigator has step foot in the crime scene. the same sources say the crime scene has not been secured. and those are two deadlines, just two new pieces of information tonight. that is not all we are learning. cnn national security contributor fwran townsend is joining now. as we often mention there is a the former white house security adviser and a member of the cia external advisory commit thai tee and in libya with her employer. and also with us is former cia officer bob behr. you have new reporting on the status of the fbi investigation. what can you tell us? >> it is extraordinary and astonishing to me who worked with the fbi over a decade. you understand when this happens and the fbi opens an investigation one of the first things they do is go to the state department and say please request permission for us to enter this country, libya, get to the crime scene, benghazi. please request that we have the security and ability to do that and that we wi
governor romney looked bad responding to the tragedy in benghazi, he seemed like he was too political and too opportunistic. it could be here that the president was a little too cool. i don't think in his defense for a minute he would say that the murder of an ambassador and other american personnel, much less all the other folks who have died in that region, is just a bump in the road. i think what he's trying to do is show everybody that we're on this, the united states is doing well and you know, i think that's a kind of typical no drama obama response. >> alex, is that what it is, the cool head of the president? >> i think there's something to that, but i think there's also a little more, and that is that this president's great strength is his intellect. he lives inside his head and his ideas. and part of it is he doesn't really feel your pain like paul's former boss, bill clinton, but he can memorize a study about it, you know. people are distant from this president. there's a certain sense of arrogance to this white house that they're just detached from it and i think that's a v
, on the killing of ambassador christopher stevens and three others in benghazi, libya on 9/11, on what the state department and others may have known about the security situation the days and weeks leading up to their killing, on what leading members of the government have said about their circumstances of the tragedy and whether their statements have lacked clarity or transparency, and of course, on who killed these four dedicated americans. that's where we've always believed the focus should be. however, because cnn discovered ambassador stevens' seven-page journal in what remains of the consulate in benghazi three days after the attack and because it became one source for some of our reporting, questions about the use and handling of that journal have been raised, as you probably heard. as you probably heard this weekend, the u.s. state department spokesman blasted cnn, calling the network's behavior quote, disgusting and our handling of the journal quote, indefensible. now, no one likes to be called disgusting, particularly by a spokesperson for the united states state department. but we do
investigators still have not set foot in the ruins of the american consulate in benghazi, libya, tonight we're the first to tell you why. tonight, we have the likely reason and we have it from a top law enforcement official. four americans as you know were murdered in the assault, one american ambassador, christopher stevens. that was two and a half weeks ago. two and a half weeks that have seen the administration first describe this as a spontaneous outburst even though our reporting revealed that officials knew within 24 hours that it was not. only much later did they back away from that assessment. today, the director of national intelligence, james clapper, put out a statement explaining that early evidence supported that theory so that's why they told the white house and congress. clapper says that throughout the investigation, his agency made it clear that the assessment was preliminary and could change. neither his statement nor our sources specify a time frame for the dni's change of view. again, our sources tell us that law enforcement officials knew within 24 hours that this was a
to provide perimeter support in benghazi, protection, in other words, but that request was not granted. fran's a former white house homeland security advisor. she served in the george w. bush administration, currently she sits on the cia external advisory panel and recently visited libya with her employer, mcandrews and forbes. also joining us, former fbi assistant director, tom fuentes, who has extensive experience investigating attacks on americans overseas, and former cia officer, bob baer. so fran, so the fbi sought military protection to go into benghazi. why didn't they get it? >> well, the answer to that question, i think, is not really clear. so it's not unusual, when you want to set up a security perimeter, you may look to the host country. if the host country is unable or unwilling to provide it, we don't know what the answer to that is, y may ask if you think you need it for u.s. military support, but that's got to go through a process. it needs state department and nsc support, the u.s. military would have to make an assessment about how big a security package that would entail a
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)